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Best Packers Players of All Time

The Packers are one of the most historic and celebrated teams in the NFL. Every year, this team shows how competitive they can be. The Packers fans are some of the most die-hard fans in the entire league, and the exciting build up to the first game of the year is intense. Reading up on the latest in NFL insight and news will help Packers fans stay informed on the latest trades and roster changes leading up to the 2020 season.

As the Packers are one of the original football teams, dating all the way back to 1919, they have had their share of memorable players over the years. With the 2020 season on the horizon, it’s a great time to look back at the players that have come before and gave the Packers their all during the time they were on the team. Here are 5 of the best Packers players in the team’s history.

Ray Nitschke (LB)

Linebacker is a roughneck physical position, and Ray Nitschke embodied it perfectly. He’s remembered for his tough, aggressive playstyle that left the opposing team scared to take the field. Nitschke had a 15 year long career with the Packers, covering 190 games. Many have called him the face of defense during the Lombardi era of the Packers, and this is a suiting title. Nitschke was named All-Pro six times during his career, and was the MVP of the 1962 championship game versus the New York Giants.

Defensive players often don’t get the admiration they deserve, but Nitschke is beloved by Packers fans. To show appreciation for his incredible service, the Packers not only retired his jersey number, but also named one of their outdoor practice fields after him, across from Lambeau Field. He was inducted into both the Packer Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame, signifying him as one of the greatest defensive players in the history of the sport.

Don Hutson (WR)

There’s not many players who can say they came along and completely reinvented their position during their career, but wide receiver Don Hutson is one of them. At the time of his retirement, Hutson held an astounding 18 NFL records. Hutson has numerous accolades to his name, like leading the league in receiving 8 times in his career. He also won the MVP award two times.

During his time playing, Hutson held the record for touchdown receptions at 99, a record that stood until being broken by Steve Largent in 1989. During the time he spent with the Packers, Hutson contributed to three NFL titles in 1936, 1939 and 1944. He stands in both the Packers and Pro Football Hall of Fame.
Hutson was an incredible athlete and, overall, he changed the idea of what a wide receiver can be. The exciting wideouts that we know today can thank Hutson to some degree for laying the groundwork.

 

Bart Starr (QB)

By all measures, Bart Starr was an incredible quarterback throughout his career. His record of five championships titles as a quarterback went unbroken for decades, until finally being overcome by Tom Brady in 2018. Starr is cemented in Packers history. He led the team to victory in the first two Super Bowls, also winning MVP in each game. He also led the NFL in passing three times in his career.

Starr had many great moments in his career, but one that will forever stick in the memory of his fans is when he executed a perfect quarterback sneak with 13 seconds on the clock in the infamous “IceBowl” of 1967. The maneuver brought the score to 21-17 with the Packers triumphing over the Dallas Cowboys. Starr was also inducted into both the Packers Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The Packers have had several incredible quarterbacks in their career, but Bart Starr will surely be one of the most memorable. He is an icon for not only the Packers, but all of professional football.

Aaron Rodgers (QB)

The Packers certainly lucked out in some respects. As soon as the Favre era was coming to a close, Rodgers was there to pick up the reins. In some ways, Rodgers was the gold standard as far as quarterbacks go. He built his reputation on being very reliable, dependable under pressure, accurate in the pocket, and he brings the best out of his teammates. Rodgers really broke out in 2009, in a season that led to his first of eight Pro Bowl appearances. In the following year, Rodgers led the Packers to their fourth Super Bowl championship.

In both 2011 and 2014, Rogers was named NFL MVP. He has led the NFL in passer ratings twice in his career, as well as being the touchdown leader in 2016. In all, Rodgers is one of the most accurate passers ever, and could possibly be crowned the #1 all time most accurate passer by the time he retires. Everything considered, Aaron Rodgers is one of the best quarterbacks to ever play the game, and certainly worthy of being called one of the best Packers players in history.

Brett Favre (QB)

While everyone is entitled to their own opinion, it’s certainly hard to argue that Brett Favre isn’t the greatest and most influential NFL player of all time. It’s difficult to find any player who can match his resume and accolades. He holds the all-time record for consecutive starts by an NFL player with 297 games, an absolutely ludicrous feat considering how often players get injured. He also made the Pro Bowl 9 times through his 16 years with the Packers, and won three straight MVP awards from 1995-1997.

Favre led the NFL in passing touchdowns four times, and in passing yards twice. While his records are commendable, Packers fans will always remember him first and foremost for leading the team to the Super Bowl in back-to-back years. Green Bay had several Super Bowl appearances in their lengthy history, but it had been nearly 30 years since the Lombardi era, and they were ready to reclaim the championship. With Favre at the helm, the Packers beat the Patriots at Super Bowl XXXI in 1996, and went on to face the Broncos at the Super Bowl the following year, though they ultimately fell short on this occasion.

Overall, Brett Favre is an absolute legend to not only the Packers fans, but the entire NFL including the quarterbacks of today.

8 Comments

  1. Deepsky April 29, 2020

    In 1933 the NFL changed the passing rules which Packers with Hutson exploited before most teams. Prior to 1933 if you passed the ball and it hit the ground before hitting a player, it was a turnover. If it hit a player and was dropped, it was a live ball. The NFL also dropped the rule requiring the pass to be made 5 yards behind the line of scrimmage. The Packers already had a good QB in Arnie Herber so that for the next 5 years the Packers lead the league in passing.

    Reply
  2. Deepsky April 29, 2020

    Here’s the difference between Favre and Rodgers. Favre had a history of playoff turnovers. 1993 Dallas, 2 INTs and a FUMBLE. 1995 Dallas, the Packers were ahead in the 4th quarter with a Super Bowl birth on the line and Favre throws a critical pick in the 4th quarter. Super Bowl 32, INT and fumble. 1998 San Fran 2 INTs. 2001 St. Louis, 6 INTs. 2002 Atlanta, first ever home playoff loss, 2 INTs and FUMBLE on the last Packer drive. 2003 Philadelphia (4th and 26 game), people forget Favre threw a critical pick in overtime. 2004 Minnesota 4 interceptions. 2007 Giants, 2 INTs including a critical pick in overtime. Rodgers played well in many playoff games, played poorly in others, but rarely turned the ball over. Special teams and defensive collapses marred his playoff losses. The only end of game critical turnover was the 2009 Arizona game, but Rodgers was getting face masked on the fumble. He threw one pick at the end 2011 Giants game and another at the end of the 2019 San Fran game, but the Packers were 17 points behind in each game with under 2 minutes left. This is why I was OK with moving on from Favre and I don’t like the Packers not laying it all on Rodgers.

    Reply
    1. PF4L April 29, 2020

      Lol….I will never…ever…get over a guy throwing 6 picks in one game. How does that even happen unless you give no fuck?

      Reply
  3. Kato April 29, 2020

    Good players, although I think Jerry Kramer certainly deserves to be on this list as well as Sterling Sharpe. Had his career not prematurely ended he likely would be in the top five in every receiving category.

    Reply
  4. Skinny April 29, 2020

    Reggie! Reggie! Reggie! God damn i miss those days. The great Reggie White. Huge man. Huuge and strong and fast. OL must have shit having to face him. Still cant believe he came to the Pack. Thank Favre and a message from god i guess for that.

    Reply
    1. PF4L April 29, 2020

      Thank Mike Holmgren for the phone call…from God. And Ron Wolf for offering him the most cash.

      Reply
      1. Deepsky May 1, 2020

        Yeah, let’s not kid ourselves. The 49ers, Redskins and Cowboys all had salary cap issues then. The Packers offered by far the most money.

        Reply
        1. PF4L May 3, 2020

          At the end of the day it doesn’t really matter why he came here. Money, God, his wife liked the City, doesn’t matter. What matters is that he came, he conquered. The move itself concerning the organization transcended any benefit on the field, which was substantial.

          Reply

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